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5 Tips To Help Prepare Your Strata For Winter

5 Tips To Help Prepare Your Strata For Winter

Winter snow is a fact of life in many parts of the world, and if you’re a strata owner or tenant, it can have an impact on your building in more ways than one. To help prepare your strata for winter weather, here are some quick maintenance tips that your strata can follow to make sure your building is ready to face the cold.

1. Identify Hard-to-Heat Areas or Areas That Receive Inefficient Heating

The first step in preparing for potential snow is to identify which areas in your building receive inefficient heating or are hard to heat. This helps ensure that these areas will stay warm throughout the winter months and reduce energy costs associated with heating them. If necessary, consider investing in additional insulation or other measures to increase their efficiency.

2. Take a Look at Your Building Exterior and Look to Fix Leaks Around Door Frames and Windows

Another important maintenance tip is to take a look at your building exterior and look to fix any leaks around door frames and windows. Leaks can allow cold air into the building resulting in higher energy bills, as well as causing damage to walls, floors, furniture, etc. Cold spots can be caused by drafts, single pane windows, lack of insulation, and even central air conditioning systems located near exterior walls.

It’s important to address these problem areas before the onset of winter so that you can reduce energy bills and keep residents comfortable during the colder months. This includes caulking around windows, replacing weatherstripping around doors, sealing cracks with caulk or expanding foam, adding insulation to attics or basements, and installing storm windows if needed.

3. Identify Essential Areas of Your Building That Will Require Heat and Power in Case of Outages

In addition to making sure all leaks are sealed up tight, you should also identify which areas of your building will require heat and power if there is a power outage during the winter months. This includes essential equipment like elevators or fire safety systems as well as common areas such as lobbies that may need additional lighting during dark hours due to earlier sunsets during this time of year.

4. Review Plumbing Areas That May Be Subject To Freezing

Another important maintenance tip is to review plumbing areas that may be subject to freezing due to extreme temperatures during winter snowstorms. Take steps to prepare your strata for winter by properly insulating pipes that may be vulnerable during a freeze and checking up on sump pumps regularly so they won’t fail when needed most! Be aware of equipment that may be subject to damage during a freeze. You should also have a plan in place in case of flooding, such as having sandbags ready to go or knowing where you can go to stay safe and dry.

If you have irrigation throughout your landscaping, make sure it is winterized. This involves turning off your water supply and forcing all residual moisture out through fittings like valves or sprinkler pipes so that when it gets cold outside, there’s nothing left behind to freeze during overnight hours! Winterizing services for irrigation should be completed by mid November each year as this helps avoid costly repairs due to frozen heads in early December.

5. Be aware of any equipment that may be subject to damage during a freeze such as refrigeration units or HVAC systems.

Do your best to prepare your strata for winter and ‘winterize’ these elements where possible by draining equipment that is unused, removing condensate, or heating areas where equipment may be stored if necessary. If  water is pooling on your roof due to melting snow from above or backed up drains below, it’s important for you take action before it causes further damage elsewhere in the building. Identify the cause of the puddles and take steps now – such as cleaning out gutters – to make sure it doesn’t happen again later down the road!

Winter weather can bring with it unforeseen problems within multi-unit dwellings like stratas – but with proper preparation now you can rest assured knowing that your strata will be ready when those snowy days arrive! By following these simple maintenance tips and taking preventative steps against pooling water – you can rest easy knowing your strata will be prepared for whatever Mother Nature throws its way this coming season!

Not Legal Advice - The material provided on the StrataPress website is for general information purposes only. It is not intended to provide legal advice or opinions of any kind and may not be used for professional or commercial purposes. No one should act, or refrain from acting, based solely upon the materials provided on this website, any hypertext links or other general information without first seeking appropriate legal or other professional advice. These materials may have no evidentiary value and should be checked against official sources before they are used for professional or commercial purposes. Your use of these materials is at your own risk.

Prevent Water Damage Before it Happens

Prevent Water Damage Before it Happens

Many people think that insurance is the only way to protect their homes from water damage. However, there are actually many things you can do to prevent water damage before it happens. By setting up a risk management program, you can educate yourself and your community on how to reduce the risks of water damage.

Risk Management Programs
Risk management programs involve educating members on how to protect themselves and their homes, setting up preventative maintenance routines, planning for emergencies, and reviewing your insurance coverage. By taking these steps, you can reduce the risks of water damage to your home.

One of the most important parts of a risk management program is educating yourself and your community on how to protect your homes from water damage. There are many things you can do to prevent water damage, such as fixing leaks as soon as they happen and regularly checking pipes and plumbing fixtures for leaks. You should also have a plan in place in case of flooding, such as having sandbags ready to go or knowing where you can go to stay safe and dry.

Risks can be classified into two types: preventable and unpreventable. Unpreventable risks would be things such as nature-related risks, i.e.: windstorm, hail, lightning.

A risk management program involves:
• educating members on how to protect themselves and their homes;
• setting up preventative maintenance routines;
• planning for emergencies; and
• reviewing your insurance coverage.

Preventative maintenance routines are another important part of reducing risks. By regularly inspecting the common areas and addressing any issues that are found, you can help to prevent accidents before they happen. This can include things like clearing snow and ice from walkways in the winter, checking for trip hazards, and making sure that handrails are secure.

Planning for emergencies is another crucial element of a good risk management program. Having an emergency plan in place will help you to know what to do if something does go wrong. This should include contact information for key personnel, as well as details on where to find important documents. If you have facilities such as a swimming pool or fitness center on-site, you should also have procedures in place for evacuating those areas in the event of an emergency.

Lastly, it’s important to review your insurance coverage periodically to make sure that you are adequately covered in case of water damage. Many homeowner’s insurance policies exclude coverage for floods, so it’s important to know what your policy covers and doesn’t cover. If you live in an area that is prone to flooding, you may want to consider purchasing flood insurance to protect your home.

Conclusion:
Strata councils have a big responsibility when it comes to protecting their properties – but it’s not one that they have to shoulder alone. By implementing a risk management program, councils can take proactive steps to reduce the risks associated with owning a strata property. From educating members on how to stay safe to regularly reviewing your insurance coverage, there are plenty of ways to make sure that your strata property is well-protected.

Not Legal Advice - The material provided on the StrataPress website is for general information purposes only. It is not intended to provide legal advice or opinions of any kind and may not be used for professional or commercial purposes. No one should act, or refrain from acting, based solely upon the materials provided on this website, any hypertext links or other general information without first seeking appropriate legal or other professional advice. These materials may have no evidentiary value and should be checked against official sources before they are used for professional or commercial purposes. Your use of these materials is at your own risk.

The Importance of Elevator Maintenance in Strata Buildings

The Importance of Elevator Maintenance in Strata Buildings

Elevators are a staple in nearly all strata buildings, and they play a vital role in the daily lives of residents. But what happens when they break down? Worse yet, what if there’s an accident? That’s why elevator maintenance is so important in strata buildings. Not only does it help keep the elevators running smoothly and efficiently, but it also helps to prevent accidents and injuries. In this blog post, we’ll discuss the importance of having a proper elevator maintenance program in place in your strata building.

Why Is Elevator Maintenance Important?
There are several reasons why elevator maintenance is so important in strata buildings. First and foremost, it helps to ensure the safety of residents. Just like any other piece of machinery, elevators can malfunction and cause accidents. By having a regular maintenance schedule, you can help to prevent these accidents from happening. Secondly, elevator maintenance helps to keep the elevators running smoothly and efficiently. Regular maintenance can help to identify potential problems before they become big issues, and it can also help to prolong the life of the elevator system. Finally, having a proper elevator maintenance program in place shows that you’re taking responsibility for the safety of your residents and their belongings.

What Does Elevator Maintenance entail?
Elevator maintenance should be performed by a licensed contractor who is familiar with the specific make and model of your building’s elevators. The contractor should inspect the elevators on a monthly basis, and they should perform a more thorough inspection on a quarterly or semi-annual basis. During these inspections, the contractor will lubricate all moving parts, check for wear and tear, and test all safety features. They will also perform a load test to ensure that the elevators are able to safely transport the maximum capacity of people and/or belongings. After each inspection, the contractor will provide you with a report that outlines any problems that were found and any repairs that were made.

Preventive Maintenance is Key to Elevator Upkeep
Elevators are a vital part of any strata building, ensuring tenants can move between floors quickly and safely. But as any property manager knows, they can also be a source of frustration when they break down. No one wants to be stuck in a stopped elevator, or worse, have to call the fire department to rescue trapped tenants.

That’s why having a proper preventive maintenance program in place is so important. By working with a licensed elevating contractor, you can help ensure your elevators are running smoothly and efficiently, and reduce the likelihood of an unexpected breakdown or incident. What you may not be aware of is that having maintenance contract in place with a BCSA‐licensed contractor isn’t a nice to have: it’s your legal responsibility.

Your Responsibility
According to the BC Safety Authority (BCSA), every elevator in a strata building must have a valid maintenance contract with a licensed contractor. This includes hydraulic, traction, and roped ‐ hydraulic elevators. The only exception is for private residences with four units or less; these buildings are not required by law to have an elevator maintenance contract, but it’s still strongly recommended.

If you don’t have a valid maintenance contract in place and an incident does occur, you could be held liable. That’s why it’s so important to work with a reputable, licensed contractor who can provide you with the peace of mind that your elevators are being properly maintained.

The Benefits of Preventive Maintenance
Aside from protecting you from legal liability, preventive elevator maintenance has other benefits as well. For example, by catching small problems before they become big ones, you can help extend the lifespan of your elevators and avoid the need for costly repairs or replacements down the road. And because well-maintained elevators are more efficient than those that aren’t, you can also help save on energy costs over time.

Conclusion:
Elevator maintenance is important for several reasons: it helps to ensure safety, keep elevators running smoothly, improve efficiency, and prolongs the life of the elevator system. If you don’t have a proper elevator maintenance program in place already, we highly recommend that you get one set up as soon as possible. Be sure to work with a licensed contractor who is familiar with your building’s specific make and model of elevator.

 The BCSA’s New Safety Order on Single Bottom Cylinders in Hydraulic Elevators

The British Columbia Safety Authority (BCSA) issued a safety order on single bottom cylinders in hydraulic elevators on December 10th, 2010, requiring that Hydraulic Elevators with “Single Bottom Cylinders” be replaced by October 8th, 2015 to comply with the CSA B44 – 2007 “Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators”. This safety order requires all strata buildings with a single bottom cylinder in their hydraulic elevator to submit a compliance plan. If you’re unsure of whether or not your strata building is affected by this order, your best course of action is to speak with your elevator maintenance contractor. They will be able to tell you what type of elevator your strata has and if it has a single bottom cylinder.

Compliance Plans and Notification Forms
If your strata does have a single bottom cylinder, you will need to submit a compliance plan to the BCSA. This compliance plan must detail how your strata intends to bring the elevator into compliance with the safety order. If you have any questions about this process, you can find more information on the BCSA website or by contacting your local authority.

The safety of your strata building’s residents should always be a top priority. With that in mind, it’s important to ensure that your elevator is in compliance with the latest safety standards. If you’re not sure where to start, speak with your elevator maintenance contractor. They will be able to advise you on the best course of action for your strata.

 

Not Legal Advice - The material provided on the StrataPress website is for general information purposes only. It is not intended to provide legal advice or opinions of any kind and may not be used for professional or commercial purposes. No one should act, or refrain from acting, based solely upon the materials provided on this website, any hypertext links or other general information without first seeking appropriate legal or other professional advice. These materials may have no evidentiary value and should be checked against official sources before they are used for professional or commercial purposes. Your use of these materials is at your own risk.