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5 Important Reasons To Have A Depreciation Report

5 Important Reasons To Have A Depreciation Report

A depreciation report for strata corporations in British Columbia is a document that outlines the current condition and estimated remaining useful life of the common property and assets of a strata corporation. The report is typically prepared by a professional engineer or other qualified person, and is used to help the strata council plan for and budget for future repairs and replacements of common property and assets. The report also contains information on the replacement cost of the assets and the estimated reserve fund. This report is mandatory for Strata Corporations in British Columbia to have after 2010.

1. Planning and Budgeting

A depreciation report helps a strata corporation plan for and budget for future repairs and replacements of common property and assets. This information is critical for the strata council to make informed decisions about how to allocate resources and maintain the building.

Planning and budgeting are indispensable aspects of efficient strata management. A depreciation report is a valuable tool for strata councils to make informed decisions about the planning and budgeting of repairs and maintenance on common property or assets. Such a report provides detailed information, including estimated lifecycles and replacement costs, that can enable planning for both short-term repairs as well as long-term projects. Armed with this document, members of the strata council can work constructively to ensure that resources are allocated appropriately and that potential risks are addressed in order to maintain a high standard and integrity for the building.

2. Legal Compliance

In British Columbia, strata corporations are required to have a depreciation report after 2010. Failing to have one can result in legal penalties.

In British Columbia, strata corporations must take the essential step of obtaining a depreciation report after 2010 in order to stay compliant with legal standards. The penalties for not having one can range from suspension of strata services to financial fines – this could cost both time and money if penalties are incurred. Even though obtaining a depreciation report is mandated by law and can be intimidating, it is necessary to ensure that your strata property remains complaint and meets legal requirements.

3. Asset Management

Depreciation reports provide an overview of the current condition and estimated remaining useful life of the common property and assets. This information is useful for the strata council to prioritize repairs and replacements and to make informed decisions about the maintenance of the building.

Asset management is an important part of ensuring that a strata building remains value-driven, and depreciation reports provide a helpful overview of the current condition of common assets and properties in order to help the strata council make informed decisions. This ensures that strata owners can maintain their asset, with necessary repairs and replacements prioritized according to expected remaining useful life, thereby preserving its value over the long term. Asset management is integral to keeping buildings in safe, good condition.

4. Contingency Reserve Fund

Depreciation reports also provide information on the replacement cost of the assets and the estimated reserve fund. This information is important for the strata council to plan for how to fund future repairs and replacements and to ensure that the reserve fund is sufficient to cover the costs.

The contingency reserve fund and the accurate information it provides are essential for the effective financial planning of any strata council. Depreciation reports allow detailed, up-to-date insight on the replacement costs associated with maintaining the building, enabling council to budget life cycle expenses and plan future repairs. A reserve fund that is large enough to cover these costs can ensure that owners are not faced with unexpected levies or special assessments. It is also important to consider that good maintenance of shared property or buildings can help protect its value. With detailed reserve fund information available in depreciation reports, strata councils have the opportunity to best manage their resources for monthly budgets and anticipated expenditures.

5. Transparency and Fairness

Depreciation reports provide transparency to the strata owners about the condition of the building and the estimated costs of future repairs and replacements. This information is important for the strata owners to understand the financial health of the building and to make informed decisions about their investment in the property.

Transparency and fairness are essential in providing direction for strata management teams. By offering depreciation reports to strata owners, transparency enables them to understand the financial health of the building, make well-informed decisions about their investment in the property, and distribute shared budgeting costs equally among all owners. With this information being made available, it increases awareness and allows everyone involved to work together as a team towards common goals by having detailed data on hand. As a result, this helps foster a sense of communal transparency and equality throughout the property.

Not Legal Advice - The material provided on the StrataPress website is for general information purposes only. It is not intended to provide legal advice or opinions of any kind and may not be used for professional or commercial purposes. No one should act, or refrain from acting, based solely upon the materials provided on this website, any hypertext links or other general information without first seeking appropriate legal or other professional advice. These materials may have no evidentiary value and should be checked against official sources before they are used for professional or commercial purposes. Your use of these materials is at your own risk.

Exploring Age Restriction Bylaws

Exploring Age Restriction Bylaws

As strata owners, realtors, lawyers and homeowners battle the effects of escalating housing costs in British Columbia’s hyper-competitive market, one solution has come to the forefront: implementing age restriction bylaws.

These types of restrictions can be used by both strata corporations and local governments as a tool for creating more accessible housing. However, with great power comes great responsibility – before making any decisions involving age restriction bylaws, it is important that stakeholders familiarize themselves with relevant legislation in order to ensure compliance.

When a strata council is deciding whether to put age restriction bylaws to a ¾ vote of the owners, the strata council must consider and weigh the needs of both current and potential future residents when deciding whether to introduce age restriction bylaws. there are practical and legal considerations to take into account as well. One practical consideration is that an age restriction bylaws may impact the number of owners willing to serve as strata council members. This is because some retirement complexes have many owners who are away for the winter months. Another practical consideration is whether age restriction bylaws will increase or decrease the purchase price of the suites in the building. Conversely, in complexes with recreational facilities close by as well as access to shopping or public transport but without schools or playgrounds nearby, introducing such restrictions could prove beneficial – helping attract like-minded individuals likely seeking similar amenities from their homes.

In assessing the impact an age restriction bylaw will have on the value of the suites, the strata council may wish to consult a realtor.

There are legal considerations to take into account when deciding whether to put an age restriction bylaw to a ¾ vote of the owners. One legal consideration is whether an age restriction bylaw is constitutional. The Supreme Court of Canada has held that age discrimination is a reasonable and justifiable limitation on the right to freedom of association under section 2(d) of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. This means that an age restriction bylaw is likely to be constitutional if it is reasonable and justifiable. A strata council should carefully consider whether an age restriction bylaw is reasonable and justifiable before putting it to a vote of the owners.

Age restrictions are a common way for strata councils to manage the demographics of their buildings, but they are not without controversy. The Strata Property Act sets out a number of requirements that must be met for an age restriction bylaw to be valid. The bylaw must be reasonable and necessary to protect the legitimate interests of the strata corporation, and it must not discriminate against any person on the basis of age or any other ground prohibited by the Human Rights Code.

Another legal consideration is whether an age restriction bylaw will contravene any provincial or federal anti-discrimination laws. For example, British Columbia’s Human Rights Code prohibits discrimination on the basis of age. This means that a strata corporation that restricts ownership or occupancy to persons over a certain age could be found to have contravened this law. Before putting an age restriction bylaw to a vote of the owners, a strata council should ensure that it does not contravene any provincial or federal anti-discrimination laws.

If an owner challenges an age restriction bylaw in court, the judge will consider whether it meets these requirements. If the bylaw is found to be discriminatory or unreasonable, the judge may find it to be unenforceable.

If the strata council decides that an age restriction bylaw would benefit the strata corporation, they should consult their condominium lawyer. If an owner challenges the bylaw in court, the judge will take into account whether it meets the requirements of the Strata Property Act (“Act”), the Human Rights Code and other federal and provincial legislation. If the age restriction bylaw does not meet these requirements, the judge may find the bylaw to be unenforceable.

The Human Rights Code prohibits discrimination against persons purchasing property on the basis of marital status but not on the basis of age. This means that a person cannot be discriminated against when purchasing property based on whether they are married, single, divorced, or widowed. However, a person can be discriminated against when purchasing property based on their age. Age is defined in the Human Rights Code as an age of nineteen (19) years or more and less than sixty-five (65) years. This means that a person who is under the age of 19 years or over the age of 65 years can be discriminated against when purchasing property.

Section 10 of the Human Rights Code lists grounds of discrimination that are prohibited when a landlord is choosing a tenant. Included in the list of prohibited grounds of discrimination is age. Therefore, a landlord cannot discriminate against tenants on the basis of age.  At first glance it appears that a strata corporation could enact an age restriction bylaw that prohibits those under the age of 19 years from residing there. However, discriminating against tenants on the basis of family status is also prohibited by section 10 of the Human Rights Code. There is no definition given in the Human Rights Code for “family status”. However, refusing to rent to parents with young children would likely be found by a judge to be discrimination on the basis of family status.

Therefore, strata corporations who wish to enact age restriction bylaws now should consider setting the age limit at fifty-five years of age and older. Exceptions should be made for spouses and visitors. Strata corporations should not only have their age restriction bylaws drafted by a lawyer but the bylaw should be reviewed by a lawyer from time to time as judges will give more direction in the coming years about what age restrictions can be legally enforced by strata corporations.

Even if a strata corporation has a bylaw that prohibits rentals, tenants are always a possibility because an owner must be allowed to rent his or her suite if he or she is under hardship. It may not make sense to apply an age restriction to owners that reside in the building that does not apply to tenants.

Changes to the Strata Property Act are now in efffect.  More information via the Vancouver Island Home Owner’s Association

Not Legal Advice - The material provided on the StrataPress website is for general information purposes only. It is not intended to provide legal advice or opinions of any kind and may not be used for professional or commercial purposes. No one should act, or refrain from acting, based solely upon the materials provided on this website, any hypertext links or other general information without first seeking appropriate legal or other professional advice. These materials may have no evidentiary value and should be checked against official sources before they are used for professional or commercial purposes. Your use of these materials is at your own risk.

The Benefits of Using Mediation for Strata Disputes

The Benefits of Using Mediation for Strata Disputes

Most strata complexes contain numerous units, which means that there are a variety of people living in close proximity. Unfortunately, this can mean that mediation for strata disputes between neighbours is necessary to settle conflict that may arise over the use of common spaces or noise levels from one unit to another. Disputes are an unavoidable part of strata living, but that doesn’t mean they have to devolve into heated arguments.

There are informal approaches you can take to resolving a dispute before it reaches the point of involving the strata council or property manager. However, when those informal approaches fail and a bylaw has been broken, strata bylaw enforcement is necessary to ensure all parties abide by the rules set forth in your strata corporation’s bylaws.

When informal attempts at resolution fail, you should turn your attention towards proper enforcement of your strata corporation’s bylaws. Strata corporations must enforce their own rules in order for them to be effective; if a rule is broken without consequence then people will continue breaking that rule again and again until someone stands up and holds them accountable. It is important for every member of the strata community—owners and tenants alike—to understand that these rules exist for everyone’s benefit and must be respected in order for everyone involved to have a pleasant experience living within the strata property.

If you are dealing with a minor dispute between two owners or tenants, such as noise levels, inappropriate use of common areas, or failure to follow regulations such as no smoking in common areas, it is always best to first try and resolve the issue informally or request a strata council hearing. The goal is not necessarily for one party to “win” over the other; rather, it is important to find a solution that everyone can agree on and abide by. This may involve compromises from both sides and understanding that sometimes the simplest solution is not always best.

While disputes between members of a strata community can often lead to animosity between parties involved, there are usually ways you can resolve these issues without having them escalate into something bigger than necessary. If a council member or strata manager is asked to help resolve these nuisance disputes, mediation may be a viable option.

What is Mediation?

Mediation is a process where a third-party neutral (the mediator) helps two or more people resolve their dispute without going to court. It is voluntary, confidential and non-adversarial, meaning that all parties involved come together in an effort to reach an agreement that satisfies everyone involved. It also allows the parties to maintain control over the outcome by coming up with mutually agreeable solutions instead of having one imposed upon them by a judge or arbitrator.

Benefits Of Mediation For Strata Councils

Using mediation for strata disputes has many benefits for councils when it comes to resolving nuisance disputes in strata complexes, including:

1. Cost savings – Mediation is often cheaper than going through the court system and can usually be completed within a day or two compared to months or even years when going through litigation. This means less time spent dealing with the dispute as well as fewer costs for legal fees, court costs and other associated expenses.

2. Improved relationships – By using mediation for strata disputes rather than litigation, councils are able to maintain good relationships between all parties involved in the dispute (i.e., tenants, owners, occupiers). This can help prevent future disputes from arising as well as allow council members and strata managers to focus on other tasks related to running the complex effectively instead of dealing with ongoing conflict between neighbours.

3. Reduced stress – As mentioned above, mediation is generally faster than litigation so it can reduce stress levels for all involved since there is less waiting time for resolution of the issue(s). Additionally, the informal setting provided by mediation for strata disputes often allows parties involved to feel more comfortable discussing sensitive issues without worrying about being judged by others or having their words misinterpreted in a courtroom setting.

Benefits Of Mediation For Parties Involved In The Dispute

In addition to its benefits for councils, choosing mediation over litigation also has advantages for those directly involved in the dispute such as:

1. Achieving closure – Participating in mediation helps individuals come up with solutions that work best for them rather than relying on someone else’s decision (i.e., judge/jury). This can help bring closure quicker so that everyone can move on with their lives without having any lingering bitterness towards each other due to unresolved issues from the past.

2. Mutually beneficial agreements – Since both parties are allowed to express their views during mediation sessions, they are more likely to come up with agreements that are mutually beneficial instead of one side feeling like they didn’t get what they wanted out of a situation or were forced into something against their will due to lack of options offered by traditional court systems . Additionally, these agreements tend not only include what each side wants but also how they plan on achieving it so that no one feels like they’re getting taken advantage of.

3. Confidentiality – Mediations are generally confidential which means that whatever happens during these meetings remains private unless both sides agree otherwise (which rarely happens). This provides added security and peace of mind knowing that personal information won’t be made public knowledge if either side chooses not too disclose it voluntarily.

Overall, there are benefit of mediation for strata disputes, it’s an effective way of addressing disputes between tenants and owners in strata complexes due its ability to provide an open forum for communication between all parties involved while also offering an alternative that is more cost effective than litigation. As a council member or strata manager facing these types of situations it is important to understand how mediation could help resolve the dispute quickly and efficiently so that all parties can move forward peacefully. By utilizing mediation services you can help restore harmony within your strata complex while simultaneously protecting everyone’s right enjoy their homes free from disturbances caused by neighbors.

Strata corporation, strata owners, residents and strata council members may use the Civil Resolution Tribunal (CRT) to resolve many strata disputes and for small claims up to $5,000. The Civil Resolution Tribunal (CRT) is Canada’s first online tribunal for resolving strata and other types of disputes. The CRT is part of the British Columbia public justice system. They offer an accessible, affordable way to resolve disputes without needing a lawyer or attending court.

The CRT offers new ways to resolve your disputes and legal issues in a timely and cost-effective manner. The CRT:

  • encourages a collaborative, problem-solving approach to dispute resolution, rather than the traditional courtroom model.
  • aims to provide timely access to justice, built around your life and your needs. It does this by providing legal information, self-help tools, and dispute resolution services to help solve your problem, as early as possible.
  • is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, from a computer or mobile device that has an internet connection. Your interaction with the other participant(s) and/or the CRT can be done when it is convenient for you. CRT services are also available by phone.

Your direct and active participation will help you reach a resolution with the other participant(s). The CRT will make a decision for you only if you and the other participants can’t agree on your own solution.

Not Legal Advice - The material provided on the StrataPress website is for general information purposes only. It is not intended to provide legal advice or opinions of any kind and may not be used for professional or commercial purposes. No one should act, or refrain from acting, based solely upon the materials provided on this website, any hypertext links or other general information without first seeking appropriate legal or other professional advice. These materials may have no evidentiary value and should be checked against official sources before they are used for professional or commercial purposes. Your use of these materials is at your own risk.

Privacy Guidelines for Strata Corporations and Strata Owners

Privacy Guidelines for Strata Corporations and Strata Owners

Many strata corporations are unaware of the requirements to adhere to the Personal Information Protection Act. As a strata owner, it’s important to be aware of your privacy rights and the privacy rights of your neighbours. This includes understanding when you can be photographed or videotaped, and when you can be asked for your personal information. Here are some privacy guidelines for strata corporations and strata owners.

1. What is a strata corporation and what are its responsibilities to its members and residents

A strata corporation is a legal entity created when a strata property is developed. It is responsible for the management and maintenance of the common areas and assets of the strata development, and for representing the interests of the strata owners. The strata corporation must comply with privacy laws, such as the Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA), and obtain consent from members before collecting, using or disclosing their personal information. In addition, the strata corporation must maintain adequate insurance coverage for the common areas and assets of the strata property.

2. The importance of privacy for strata corporations and their members

In today’s world, privacy is more important than ever. There are laws in place to protect individuals from having their personal information collected and used without their consent. These laws apply to strata corporations and their members.

Strata owners have a right to expect that their privacy will be respected. The Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA) sets out rules for how businesses must collect, use and disclose personal information. consent. Strata corporations must ensure that they comply with PIPA when handling personal information about strata owners. This includes ensuring that personal information is only collected for legitimate purposes, and that it is used and disclosed in a way that is consistent with the strata owner’s expectations.

Failure to comply with PIPA can result in significant penalties, so it is important for strata corporations to make privacy a priority.

3. Privacy guidelines for strata corporations and their agents when it comes to collecting, using, and disclosing personal information

When collecting personal information, strata corporations and their agents must ensure that the information is necessary for the purposes of managing the property or providing services to residents. Personal information should only be collected from individuals who have consented to its collection. Strata corporations and their agents must also take reasonable steps to keep personal information accurate and up-to-date. Strata corporations must also take reasonable steps to destroy or de-identify personal information that is no longer needed.

Disclosing personal information to third parties is only permitted in certain circumstances, such as when required by law or with the individual’s consent. When disclosing personal information to third parties, strata corporations must take reasonable steps to ensure that the information is accurate and up-to-date, and is only disclosed for legitimate purposes.

4. How to protect the personal information of residents in a strata corporation

Strata corporations must take steps to protect the personal information of residents from unauthorized access, use, or disclosure. There are several measures that a strata corporation can take to protect the privacy of residents, such as:

  • Restricting access to personal information to authorized staff or council members only
  • Securely storing personal information in a locked filing cabinet or server room
  • Shredding or destroying personal information when it is no longer needed
  • Creating and enforcing policies and procedures for the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information
  • Training staff on privacy and security procedures

By taking these steps, strata corporations can help to ensure that the personal information of residents is protected.

5. Tips for strata corporations and their agents on how to keep personal information secure

As the world becomes increasingly digital, strata corporations and their agents must take care to protect the personal information of residents. One way to do this is to store data on secure servers. Information should only be accessed with the consent of the individual concerned, and all data should be encrypted to protect it from hackers. In addition, strata corporations and their agents should take care to protect online information. Computers should be password protected and kept in a secure location.

Any physical copies of personal information should be shredded or destroyed when no longer needed. By taking these simple steps, strata corporations can help to keep personal information safe and secure.

6. Resources for further reading on privacy and data protection

There are a number of excellent resources available for anyone interested in learning more about privacy and data protection. The Canadian Home Owners Association (CHOA) has published a series of privacy guidelines that provide a great overview of the issue. The BC Government’s Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner also has a number of helpful resources on their website, including the “Privacy Guidelines For Strata Corporations and Strata Agents’ publication. These guidelines will help strata corporations and strata agents in discharging their duties under the Strata Property Act (“SPA”) in a manner that respects the privacy of owners and tenants and promotes transparency in the operation of strata corporations. Finally, the Vancouver Island Strata Owners Association (VISOA) has published a paper on “Privacy Guidelines for Strata Corporations and Strata Agents” which is definitely worth a read.

Not Legal Advice - The material provided on the StrataPress website is for general information purposes only. It is not intended to provide legal advice or opinions of any kind and may not be used for professional or commercial purposes. No one should act, or refrain from acting, based solely upon the materials provided on this website, any hypertext links or other general information without first seeking appropriate legal or other professional advice. These materials may have no evidentiary value and should be checked against official sources before they are used for professional or commercial purposes. Your use of these materials is at your own risk.

5 Tips To Help Prepare Your Strata For Winter

5 Tips To Help Prepare Your Strata For Winter

Winter snow is a fact of life in many parts of the world, and if you’re a strata owner or tenant, it can have an impact on your building in more ways than one. To help prepare your strata for winter weather, here are some quick maintenance tips that your strata can follow to make sure your building is ready to face the cold.

1. Identify Hard-to-Heat Areas or Areas That Receive Inefficient Heating

The first step in preparing for potential snow is to identify which areas in your building receive inefficient heating or are hard to heat. This helps ensure that these areas will stay warm throughout the winter months and reduce energy costs associated with heating them. If necessary, consider investing in additional insulation or other measures to increase their efficiency.

2. Take a Look at Your Building Exterior and Look to Fix Leaks Around Door Frames and Windows

Another important maintenance tip is to take a look at your building exterior and look to fix any leaks around door frames and windows. Leaks can allow cold air into the building resulting in higher energy bills, as well as causing damage to walls, floors, furniture, etc. Cold spots can be caused by drafts, single pane windows, lack of insulation, and even central air conditioning systems located near exterior walls.

It’s important to address these problem areas before the onset of winter so that you can reduce energy bills and keep residents comfortable during the colder months. This includes caulking around windows, replacing weatherstripping around doors, sealing cracks with caulk or expanding foam, adding insulation to attics or basements, and installing storm windows if needed.

3. Identify Essential Areas of Your Building That Will Require Heat and Power in Case of Outages

In addition to making sure all leaks are sealed up tight, you should also identify which areas of your building will require heat and power if there is a power outage during the winter months. This includes essential equipment like elevators or fire safety systems as well as common areas such as lobbies that may need additional lighting during dark hours due to earlier sunsets during this time of year.

4. Review Plumbing Areas That May Be Subject To Freezing

Another important maintenance tip is to review plumbing areas that may be subject to freezing due to extreme temperatures during winter snowstorms. Take steps to prepare your strata for winter by properly insulating pipes that may be vulnerable during a freeze and checking up on sump pumps regularly so they won’t fail when needed most! Be aware of equipment that may be subject to damage during a freeze. You should also have a plan in place in case of flooding, such as having sandbags ready to go or knowing where you can go to stay safe and dry.

If you have irrigation throughout your landscaping, make sure it is winterized. This involves turning off your water supply and forcing all residual moisture out through fittings like valves or sprinkler pipes so that when it gets cold outside, there’s nothing left behind to freeze during overnight hours! Winterizing services for irrigation should be completed by mid November each year as this helps avoid costly repairs due to frozen heads in early December.

5. Be aware of any equipment that may be subject to damage during a freeze such as refrigeration units or HVAC systems.

Do your best to prepare your strata for winter and ‘winterize’ these elements where possible by draining equipment that is unused, removing condensate, or heating areas where equipment may be stored if necessary. If  water is pooling on your roof due to melting snow from above or backed up drains below, it’s important for you take action before it causes further damage elsewhere in the building. Identify the cause of the puddles and take steps now – such as cleaning out gutters – to make sure it doesn’t happen again later down the road!

Winter weather can bring with it unforeseen problems within multi-unit dwellings like stratas – but with proper preparation now you can rest assured knowing that your strata will be ready when those snowy days arrive! By following these simple maintenance tips and taking preventative steps against pooling water – you can rest easy knowing your strata will be prepared for whatever Mother Nature throws its way this coming season!

Not Legal Advice - The material provided on the StrataPress website is for general information purposes only. It is not intended to provide legal advice or opinions of any kind and may not be used for professional or commercial purposes. No one should act, or refrain from acting, based solely upon the materials provided on this website, any hypertext links or other general information without first seeking appropriate legal or other professional advice. These materials may have no evidentiary value and should be checked against official sources before they are used for professional or commercial purposes. Your use of these materials is at your own risk.

5 Tips For Using Social Media as a Strata Owner

5 Tips For Using Social Media as a Strata Owner

 5 Tips for Using Social Media Effectively as a Strata Owner

As a strata owner, you’re automatically a part of a community. And like any good community, communication is key to making sure everything runs smoothly. Thanks to the internet, gone are the days of having to rely on paper notices or in-person meetings to get information out to your fellow strata owners. But with this increased convenience comes the need to be more mindful about how you use social media to communicate with your strata. Here are 5 tips for using social media effectively as a Strata Owner.

1. Use private groups or forums instead of public pages.

One of the great things about social media is that it allows you to easily connect with other people who have similar interests. When it comes to your strata property, this means you can join online groups like B.C. Strata Living on Facebook or forums for strata owners like StrataCommons.ca, where you can ask questions and get advice from other strata owners. But beware of using public pages instead of private groups or forums — anything you post on a public page is fair game for anyone on the internet to see, which could lead to security risks for your strata property if used incorrectly.

2. Be Active and Engaged.

Once you have joined a group or forum, be sure to participate regularly. Don’t just sit back and read what other people are saying—contribute to the conversation! The more active you are, the more likely you are to get helpful advice from other members of the group. Be sure to stay on topic and keep it relevant.

3. Ask Questions!

One of the best things about social media is that it provides a platform for you to ask questions and get answers from experts in real-time. Don’t be afraid to reach out to your peers for help when you need it. Chances are, someone has already gone through what you’re going through and can offer some valuable insights. Questions should be about a topic that is within the scope of the Strata Property Act; other relevant legislation; and living in a BC Strata Corporation.

4. Use social media to stay up-to-date on strata news.

In addition to using private groups and forums, another great way to use social media as a strata owner is to follow official strata pages or accounts. This way, you can stay up-to-date on any news or updates that might affect your strata property without having to sift through lots of irrelevant information. Use Google Alerts to get email notifications when new results for a topic show up in Google Search.

5. Be respectful and considerate when posting online.

Just as you would in real life, it’s important to be respectful and considerate when communicating with your fellow strata owners online. This means not posting anything that could be considered offensive or inflammatory, as well as being mindful of other people’s privacy by not sharing personal information without permission. If you wouldn’t say it in person, don’t say it online!

Social media is a powerful tool – but only if used correctly. As a strata owner, you can use social media platforms like Facebook to stay up-to-date on news affecting your property, join private groups and forums for advice from other owners, and even follow official pages or accounts for timely updates. Just remember to be respectful and considerate when posting online, and always err on the side of caution by keeping personal information private. By following these simple tips – joining relevant groups and forums, being active and engaged, and asking questions – you can effectively use social media as a strata owner to get the information and advice you need.

Not Legal Advice - The material provided on the StrataPress website is for general information purposes only. It is not intended to provide legal advice or opinions of any kind and may not be used for professional or commercial purposes. No one should act, or refrain from acting, based solely upon the materials provided on this website, any hypertext links or other general information without first seeking appropriate legal or other professional advice. These materials may have no evidentiary value and should be checked against official sources before they are used for professional or commercial purposes. Your use of these materials is at your own risk.